IamaAstronaut
WHEN I’M COPYING MY FRIEND’S SOLUTION & POINT OUT AN ERROR
diabolicalillumination:

Truth.

I am averaging about 1-2 hours of sleep a night now. Graduation is a little too far off for this D: 

diabolicalillumination:

Truth.

I am averaging about 1-2 hours of sleep a night now. Graduation is a little too far off for this D: 

yes.

HOW I FEEL DURING 90% OF MY SEMESTER
WHEN I SEE PEOPLE THAT TAKE TIME TO DRESS UP FOR CLASS

howdoiputthisgently:

I’M LIKE:

image

maisiewilliams:

how to survive college: 1) make icalendar and google docs your best friend, 2) do the majority of your homework before dinner time, 3) get 5 hours of sleep at least every night, and 4) drink alcohol when steps 1-3 stop working. 

Unless you’re an engineer then 

1)Start your homework the minute it is assigned so you will hopefully get it done by the time it is due. (but you will probably still have to rush to get it finished last minute because there is not enough time in the day to live)

2)You are lucky if you get 2 or 3 hours of sleep a night

3)Alcohol can be consumed at all times of the day because without it you will probably lose your shit

4)Make sure you wake up 5 minutes early to eat breakfast because you will not have time/will forget to eat throughout the day

5)Learn how to hold your tongue when non-engineers start complaining about their schoolwork. 

Space is my canvas

I’m glad I decided to be an engineer. I have more confidence in the laws of physics than I do in my artistic ability.

I could be like OH I suck at this art and everyone hates my stuff guess I’m not eating this month.

But as an engineer, physics doesn’t give a shit what other people think about it because it’s still there like. HAY I’M HERE AND I GOVERN YOUR LIFE DEAL WITH IT!

We’re getting there :)

futurist-foresight:

Ion propulsion shows promise in terms of deep space exploration.

placeofpluto:

crookedindifference:

NASA Ion Thruster Achieves World-Record 5+ Years of Operation

A NASA advanced ion propulsion engine has successfully operated for more than 48,000 hours, or 5 and a half years, making it the longest test duration of any type of space propulsion system demonstration project ever.

The thruster was developed under NASA’s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Project at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland. Glenn manufactured the test engine’s core ionization chamber. Aerojet Rocketdyne of Sacramento, Calif., designed and built the ion acceleration assembly.

The 7-kilowatt class thruster could be used in a wide range of science missions, including deep space missions identified in NASA’s Planetary Science Decadal Survey.

“The NEXT thruster operated for more than 48,000 hours,” said Michael J. Patterson, principal investigator for NEXT at Glenn. “We will voluntarily terminate this test at the end of this month, with the thruster fully operational. Life and performance have exceeded the requirements for any anticipated science mission.”

The NEXT engine is a type of solar electric propulsion in which thruster systems use the electricity generated by the spacecraft’s solar panel to accelerate the xenon propellant to speeds of up to 90,000 mph. This provides a dramatic improvement in performance compared to conventional chemical rocket engines.

During the endurance test performed in a high vacuum test chamber at Glenn, the engine consumed about 1,918 pounds (870 kilograms) of xenon propellant, providing an amount of total impulse that would take more than 22,000 (10,000 kilograms) of conventional rocket propellant for comparable applications.

Take note, this is really important

futurist-foresight:

Our daily Shuttle magnificence!
elansinclair:

VAB


The beauty of engineering.

futurist-foresight:

Our daily Shuttle magnificence!

elansinclair:

VAB

The beauty of engineering.

inthenoosphere:

The next generation of scientists


I’m part of the 18%! Go engineers haha. 

inthenoosphere:

The next generation of scientists

I’m part of the 18%! Go engineers haha.